Thread: MFT to Nikon F or G or ..? Basic question

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  1. #1 MFT to Nikon F or G or ..? Basic question 
    Alright BMC friends, so I'm going to get a BMPCC Metabones speed booster this summer, but need to save a little for now, and want to get some glass...

    Long story short, what would you Nikon heads say would be better to invest in, the G or F series? I'm not clear on the differences and I want to get a dumb M43 adapter to Nikon to use before I get the Metabones SB.

    Thanks for any helpful explanation or advice!
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  2. #2  
    From what I understand, G just means there is no aperture ring on the lens. This doesn't really matter since you can use the speed booster to control the aperture. Just make sure your dumb adapter has a ring to control the aperture as well.
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  3. #3  
    Member PerroneFord's Avatar
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    G = Gelded. And yes, there is no aperture ring.

    If you are going to buy glass there are three general categories to be shopping.

    1. Manual Focus Nikon Glass
    2. AF Nikon glass in the "D" series (these have aperture rings)
    3. AF Nikon glass in the "G" series. These have no aperture rings.

    BY FAR I prefer the manual focus lenses. They are cheaper, have better mechanical controls and feelings, have no electronics to fail, and have a classic "look". The "G" lenses have modern coatings, are generally very good, with minimal distortion, etc. The D series lenses are a mix of both worlds depending on their age. Some are very close to the "G" lenses, and other older ones are much closer to the MF lenses.

    If I didn't shoot Nikon for stills work, I'd simply have 10-15 manual focus Nikon lenses and call it a day.
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  4. #4  
    Senior Member Adam Roberts's Avatar
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    As munkey_mike says Nikon G is simple an Nikon F mount lens without an aperture ring. The aperture is still mechanical but it's controlled from inside the mount by the camera or the Nikon G type adaptor.

    Pretty much all Nikon G lenses are AF-S. This means they have electronic motors inside them used to focus. These don't get used when manually focusing, like on the Speed Booster or any other adaptor. So you'll be paying for stuff that of no use unless you plan on using them on a Nikon camera. The focus throw of AF-S lenses is also very short. So you don't have much fine control.

    The older AI and AI-S Nikon lenses are all full manual. They have metal bodies and longer focus throws. These are generally better options for video work.
    Adam Roberts
    www.adamroberts.net
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  5. #5  
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    Lets keep is simple.

    Nikon G lens = no aperture ring
    Nikon F lens = aperture ring

    MFT to Nikon G adapter = has a built in aperture ring to control Nikon G lenses.
    MFT to Nikon F adapter = does not have a built in aperture ring.

    Nikon F lenses work on both F and G adapters
    Nikon G lenses work on both F and G adapters, but when used with an F adaper there is no way to control the lenses aperture.
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  6. #6  
    Member PerroneFord's Avatar
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    This isn't "simple", it's wrong.

    There is no such thing as a Nikon "F" lens. There are non-AI, AI, AiS, AF-i, AF-D, AF-S. Nikon lenses have an "F-Mount", but that goes for the G series lenses too.

    As far as the Metabones adapters are concerned, the only distinction is "G" series lenses (no aperture ring) and EVERYTHING else.


    Quote Originally Posted by Brian@202020 View Post
    Lets keep is simple.

    Nikon G lens = no aperture ring
    Nikon F lens = aperture ring
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  7. #7  
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    You are correct. I was trying to make things simple and black and white so people understand better. You just made things more complicated again. Good job.
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  8. #8  
    Member PerroneFord's Avatar
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    I prefer to give people ACCURATE information, even if it's not dumbed down. I believe that anyone with the capacity to navigate this forum and who can manage to buy a BMD camera, can manage to grasp the 2 line post I made.

    Clearly, you feel differently. That's ok.
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  9. #9  
    All good guys, thanks for the clarification and the simplification. I like your approach PerroneFord. I think I'm more into the all mechanical approach as well.
    The Lumix 12-35 2.8 has been great, but the auto focus and auto iris are starting to bug me as I spend more hours with the camera.
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