Thread: Archiving the massive raw media

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  1. #11  
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    Just grab 500GB Samsung HDD - they go for $45 down here in Oz.
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  2. #12  
    Senior Member Peter J. DeCrescenzo's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Simon Shasha View Post
    Just grab 500GB Samsung HDD - they go for $45 down here in Oz.
    I just bought three 3TB 7200rpm Seagate Barracuda SATA-6 bare hard drives for less than $150 US each.

    In about a year, 4-6TB drives may cost less.

    Amazing.
    Last edited by Peter J. DeCrescenzo; 08-08-2012 at 05:46 PM.
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  3. #13  
    reduce the size by backing up compressed. you only need to back up raw on the problem clips
    J.Davis
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  4. #14  
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    Quote Originally Posted by J Davis View Post
    reduce the size by backing up compressed. you only need to back up raw on the problem clips
    Just make sure Cineform or whatever compression codec you use doesn't go out of business or become impossible to run on current systems. Unreadable archives are not happy things.
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  5. #15  
    Quote Originally Posted by Peter J. DeCrescenzo View Post
    I just bought three 3TB 7200rpm Seagate Barracuda SATA-6 bare hard drives for less than $150 US each.

    In about a year, 4-6TB drives may cost less.

    Amazing.
    Whoa, I just bought (5 minutes ago) four of those exact drives from Amazon to go in my new eSATA RAID.

    Great minds and such...
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  6. #16  
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    LTO-5 all the way. You get about 1.4 TB per tape realistically and it is fast and solid. It is fast enough that if you want you can use LTFS which means the tape shows up as a hard drive on the desktop. Not random access mind you but you are making backups not every day working files.
    Unlike hard drives they don't need to be spun up every 6 months to a year to keep them safe and as tape is a mature format, you can bank on being able to access the data 20 years from now.
    Plus LTO drives can all write one revision back and read 2 revisions back. Meaning I can read tapes I made with an LTO-3 drive and I don't have to worry that if I upgrade to LTO-7 I won't be able to read my tapes.

    Cheers,

    Toby
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  7. #17  
    Is there a program that can quickly convert uncompressed DNG files to losslessly compressed DNG files? If not, it wouldn't be difficult to write. There are variations of DNG that use huffman compression that IIRC get about a 2:1 compression ratio. It makes them slower to read, but the data is exactly the same. If there's a good workflow it would make sense to save on archiving costs.
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  8. #18  
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    or you could convert them to EXRs though I'm not 100% sure you would keep all the metadata.
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  9. #19  
    Senior Member Peter J. DeCrescenzo's Avatar
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    I wonder if anyone has worked through a comparison of the probability of in 10, 25, 50+ years finding accessible, affordable, working circa 2012 LTO tape reader systems (including hardware, software & operator) vs. accessible, affordable, working circa 2012 computer hard drive reader systems (including hardware, software & operator)?

    I think the "accessible, affordable, working" aspect of the problem is important. Big-budget productions might be able to stack the archive odds in their favor, but regardless, it's still a management challenge. However, for everyone else it gets down to can you afford it?, do you have access to it?, does it work?, and is there an operator available who know how to use it? (w/o destroying the backup files in the process!)

    Today, there exists tens of thousands of LTO reader systems vs. tens (hundreds?) of millions of hard drive reader systems (e.g.: personal computers).

    It's an interesting question: What's more likely: Being able to actually read data off LTO tape, or off a hard disk drive, "far" in the future relatively conveniently & affordably?

    In part I think the answer has to do with how many backups exist. If there is only 1 backup on an LTO tape and 1 backup on a HDD, probability-wise my guess the LTO might be more "readable", simply because tape is more durable. But if multiple backups on hard disk drives exist, then my guess is that the odds can shift simply because there may be many more old PCs & Macs lying around than LTO systems.

    Ideally you'd backup to both LTO tape & HDD. Best of both worlds. And, as mentioned above, make at least one real film print, too. Film is good for >100 years, and a machine to "read" it can be cobbled-together if need be. :-)
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  10. #20  
    For client media I make sure it's there responsibility.

    For personal media I evaluate everything and ask myself - do I really need to keep a copy of this?

    For 99.9 % of cases keeping prores in the cloud works fine. For the .1% use raw
    Check amazon s3 for cheap cloud storage LINK
    J.Davis
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