Thread: Exposing skin tones FC

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  1. #11  
    Senior Member DPStewart's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rick.lang View Post
    When exposing with false colour, with BMD cameras that have a wide latitude, you may not need to nail the exposure. If I’m shooting when there are strong shadows and highlights, I try to make sure I avoid purple and yelling w/red. So the bright side of the face can be light grey or pink. And the shadow could be grey or green or dark grey and you will still have a good exposure.

    Whichever technique you use, use it consistently in a scene. And lean in the director the final result you want to achieve in post.
    Yup.

    As for communication with the Director- I understand that David Evans frequently gets into heated arguments with his director on set.
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  2. #12  
    Senior Member rick.lang's Avatar
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    Haha, DP. Corrected my auto spell typo... “lean in the direction...”
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  3. #13  
    Senior Member Jon's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by david evans View Post
    Hey guys,

    For those of you using False Color to nail exposure, I know that pink (in bmd chart) is where skin tones should fall. But not all lighting is flat. Let's say you have a rembrandt lighting and the right side of the face is 1 stop over the left side. Which side should be falling in the pink color? And if I change the shot to frame just the side that's in the shadow? Do you then expose that side for pink?

    Thanks
    A common practice is to shoot from the shadow side, or use up stage key lighting. The key side would be the side pink, grey, green or whatever mood you're going for. If reframing for a profile where your key side isn't showing you don't have to adjust your exposure at all but you can always tweak the lighting if you feel the need to. This will maintain continuity in your contrast and tone.
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  4. #14  
    Senior Member david evans's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by DPStewart View Post
    Yup.

    As for communication with the Director- I understand that David Evans frequently gets into heated arguments with his director on set.
    Hahaha. Thankfully, most of the times I am also the director. Otherwise, I would definitely show him!

    Thank you all for your input. I've been exploring FC more and more lately, as I believe there is a different sensor response as the skin tones fall into different parts of the luminance spectrum, even when shooting raw. I've had situations where specular highlights became almost impossible to get a good rolloff.
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  5. #15  
    Senior Member rick.lang's Avatar
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    Specular highlights on materials like car chrome for example are likely always going to clip and that would rarely be a concern. If you tried to expose them without clipping, there’s a good chance your shadows will be clipping next. I think the only specular highlights (that might be stretching the definition of specular) I’d be concerned about might be if they are on facial features you want to retain and that might arise with a sweaty face reflecting the sun for example.
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  6. #16  
    Senior Member david evans's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by rick.lang View Post
    Specular highlights on materials like car chrome for example are likely always going to clip and that would rarely be a concern. If you tried to expose them without clipping, there’s a good chance your shadows will be clipping next. I think the only specular highlights (that might be stretching the definition of specular) I’d be concerned about might be if they are on facial features you want to retain and that might arise with a sweaty face reflecting the sun for example.
    Rick, specular highlights on faces are the ones I'm concerned about. Mostly when they're the result of overexposing and not necessarily a hotspot from the sun. FC is a great help with that
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  7. #17  
    Senior Member rick.lang's Avatar
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    Yes, true. I’d just refer to those as highlights though. Depending upon the surface area as the camera sees things, some Hights could blow if the shadow information was more important. That might happen when light is falling from behind and the subject is slightly turned toward the light.
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