Thread: smoke vs haze

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  1. #11  
    Senior Member Timothy Cook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by stip View Post
    I'm really not so sure about burning it though

    Heating the oil is how pretty much every DJ/Film "fogger" works. The "hazers", are the type which use water based liquids with compression to atomize the liquid into the air.

    Most "foggers" have auto temperature controls on them to keep the fog nice and white. Hence why I recommended to Frank to leave the the bug fogger on it's lowest setting. This will be plenty of heat to billow out tons of fog.
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  2. #12  
    Senior Member Timothy Cook's Avatar
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    Just to clarify because you may not be sure how a Studio "Fogger" works. You have to plug them in and allow electric coils inside the DJ/Studio Fogger the time needed to heat the dispersion tube inside the fogger. They have warning signs on them that say "Do Not Touch Here" because they get very hot at the tip.

    This is the exact same thing that a Bug Fogger does, except it uses propane to heat the dispersion tube, which has a added benefit of making it 100% potable, no electricity needed. A Bug Fogger is exactly the same exact thing as a studio fogger, it just uses propane instead of electricity. It's a consumer fogger, not a DIY, not fake, it's not dangerous (depends on the user lol). It just uses propane instead of electricity, and is portable.

    Think of a boiling pot of water on a stove. Inside the pot the water doesn't know if a flame or a electric grill is heating the pot it is in. It just knows that the pot is getting hot.


    And A Side Note: You can also use the water based liquid in a bug fogger, it just won't fog as thick as the mineral oil. And thats why I recommended the mineral oil.
    Last edited by Timothy Cook; 07-20-2017 at 05:52 PM.
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  3. #13  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timothy Cook View Post
    Heating the oil is how pretty much every DJ/Film "fogger" works. The "hazers", are the type which use water based liquids with compression to atomize the liquid into the air.
    Timothy, it's the other way around.

    Oil based hazers push mineral oil through a compressor.
    Water based hazers/fog machines heat up (water based) fluid.

    As far as I know, heating up mineral oil may well produce smoke, but that smoke is not safe to inhale.
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  4. #14  
    Senior Member Timothy Cook's Avatar
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    It's not the other way around. "Fogger" vs "Hazer". You keep saying oil based "Hazer". I'm not talking about using a Hazer. I'm talking about using a fogger. Foggers heat the liquid that they use, Hazers using compressors. Most "Foggers" you can interchange oil or water. Oil will produce denser smoke but easily set of alarms, and when used indoors will leave a residue (so heating oil for fog indoors should be used with care). Water based inside the same fogger will produce less smoke and be cleaner. But the two substances are used in heated foggers, interchangeable, throughout several industries that use foggers.

    And I totally get what your saying about only using oil in a compressed hazer type system. But if you're outside and need lot's of fog/smoke you can use a heated fogger with oil and get great results.

    Lets forget about "Hazers" for a sec. I just was making a reference to your comment about, 'Not thinking it was safe to heat oil for fog', and I wanted to assure you that these foggers are made to heat both, but you need to understand where to use the two different substances. But if you're indoors and want to use water based fog juice you can do that too. It will work with both.

    And you are very correct in saying it's smoke because it is, and breathing in heated oil isn't the best thing, I'm not disagreeing with that at all.
    Last edited by Timothy Cook; 07-20-2017 at 07:10 PM.
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  5. #15  
    Senior Member Timothy Cook's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Timothy Cook View Post
    Heating the oil is how pretty much every DJ/Film "fogger" works. The "hazers", are the type which use water based liquids with compression to atomize the liquid into the air.

    Most "foggers" have auto temperature controls on them to keep the fog nice and white. Hence why I recommended to Frank to leave the the bug fogger on it's lowest setting. This will be plenty of heat to billow out tons of fog.

    Ugggh, sorry Stip. I see where the miscommunication was . lol I wrote water based (shown in red) when I was thinking and meant to write oil for use in the Hazers under compression.. Sorry, I hate when I do that.
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  6. #16  
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    No problem.

    I just wanted to state that to my knowledge, oil based fluids should not be spread into the air by heating, but by compressing.
    Heating ordinary mineral oil to the point that it smokes, to my knowledge, is something you should not expose your talent or crew to, certainly not indoors.
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  7. #17  
    Senior Member Frank Glencairn's Avatar
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    ...or just burn some tires
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  8. #18  
    Senior Member david evans's Avatar
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    Some great info here guys. I want to use haze / smoke in my project pretty much the same way Kaminsky uses it on every Spielberg film. He uses a lot in the background to create the illusion of mistery and that there's no real end to the background. So haze is the only way? Smoke would do it but a pain to control?
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  9. #19  
    Senior Member Frank Glencairn's Avatar
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    In a nutshell yes. Smoke is hard to get consistent from shot to shot, and often just looks like the carpet is burning.
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  10. #20  
    Senior Member david evans's Avatar
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    Here's a subtle use of haze in the movie Lincoln that ilustrates what I'm talking about.

    maxresdefault.jpg

    Frank, I will try a hazer then. In my country they cost 80eur/day as opposed to 20/day a smoke machine costs.

    I will also study the diy solution Timothy mentioned.
    Last edited by david evans; 07-21-2017 at 10:10 AM.
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