Thread: Dynamic Range - BMPCC

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  1. #1 Dynamic Range - BMPCC 
    Junior Member Meiereika's Avatar
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    Hey Folks,
    what do you guys experienced in terms of dynamic range?
    Does the BMPCC really perform best at ISO 800?

    If found that 1600 gives a little bit more highlight detail but a little more noise in the shadows. But no problem for a proper denoising tool.
    Here are two test shots. Same grading applied to both clips:
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/suec11hywd...treme.jpg?dl=0
    https://www.dropbox.com/s/w67w7v79fl...treme.jpg?dl=0


    The BMPCC is advertised to have 13 stops of dynmic range. Does that apply to ProRes or RAW or both?
    Is RAW really giving you a DR advantage?
    Last edited by Meiereika; 07-17-2017 at 06:07 AM.
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  2. #2  
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    Dynamic range depends on the situation and your exposure, and whether you shoot raw or Prores.

    Shooting raw, for normal as well as lower light/lower contrast situations I expose for ISO 400. In very low light you might even expose for ISO 200. By doing so, you basically assign more stops of the dynamic range to the left from middle grey, towards the shadows, and less to the right of middle grey, the highlights.

    On the contrary, in bright sunlight for example you might want to expose for ISO 800, to have more stops of dynamic range right from middle grey to protect highlights.

    I rarely shoot Prores so someone else might have an advice there.
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  3. #3  
    Senior Member Michael Sandiford's Avatar
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    It's more about what you can do with that dynamic range in raw that matters. There are many cameras available now that have higher dynamic range than the original 2.5k, but because the codecs are so low in the data they aren't worth shit. Once you take them into post they fall apart where as with the Blackmagics all the detail is there. Don't get to excited when someone shows a card showing the dynamic card tests of Black to White. Whats more important for me now is how much detail in the colour they have in those steps.
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  4. #4  
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    I've not run any specific tests on this, but in real world use I have not noticed any difference in DR performance between the ISO's.

    I always shoot RAW.
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  5. #5  
    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Simon View Post
    I've not run any specific tests on this, but in real world use I have not noticed any difference in DR performance between the ISO's.

    I always shoot RAW.
    I have noticed that both the BMPC 4k and the BMMCC can push shadows more in underexposed or low light when at 200iso. The BMPC 4k's raw noise is pleasing to my eye depending on the project, feels like film, so sometimes I will use 800iso solely for that reason.
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  6. #6  
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    I shoot raw occasionally for TV spots, but since I mostly make documentaries it's much more practical to shoot ProRes, even at 422... I use the Pocket and Micro regularly, and honestly I don't know if the dynamic range is 10, 12 or 13 stops, but it's way better than any other cameras I've used recently - at some point it's all about nailing the exposure in the first place.
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  7. #7  
    Senior Member k Stark's Avatar
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    It was stated early on ( by J.B. I believe ) that on the BMCC ( and pocket) there is no difference between raw 200, raw 400 and raw 800. think of it as a brightness control on your monitor...when you get into resolve it will be the same if you adjust for exposure.
    However RAW 1600 has a bit of a different curve at the low end it terms of how the 16 bit linear gets converted into the 12 bit log.

    I only tested 800 versus 1600 for the low stuff, and I got mixed results where one was better sometimes and then the other, but that was early on. With the non raw formats you lose about a stop or more I believe, and you can see this in resolve.
    I would just test it your self and see what works. 98% of the time I shoot raw 800.

    Edit:
    Just to +1 on what Michael said above. In the prores/dnx formats, it seems like color gets squashed on the low and high end, due to the nature of the compression codecs.
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  8. #8  
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    Quote Originally Posted by stip View Post
    Dynamic range depends on the situation and your exposure, and whether you shoot raw or Prores.

    Shooting raw, for normal as well as lower light/lower contrast situations I expose for ISO 400. In very low light you might even expose for ISO 200. By doing so, you basically assign more stops of the dynamic range to the left from middle grey, towards the shadows, and less to the right of middle grey, the highlights.

    On the contrary, in bright sunlight for example you might want to expose for ISO 800, to have more stops of dynamic range right from middle grey to protect highlights..
    Stip, can you elaborate on this exposure technique for getting the best DR? Thanks.
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    Well, it's not really too complicated: if you rate the camera as 800 ISO, mid-gray will sit right in the middle of DR. So you have the latitude equally distributed to the shadows and the highlights. If you rate it lower, you give more steps to the shadows. If you rate it higher, you give more to the highlights. The DR doesn't change at all.
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  10. #10  
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    Quote Originally Posted by Nomad View Post
    Well, it's not really too complicated: if you rate the camera as 800 ISO, mid-gray will sit right in the middle of DR. So you have the latitude equally distributed to the shadows and the highlights. If you rate it lower, you give more steps to the shadows. If you rate it higher, you give more to the highlights. The DR doesn't change at all.
    What Nomad said.

    Shooting raw on the BMPCC, dialing in an ISO value doesn't do anything to the image you capture, but it changes the image you see on the monitor and the values the histogram shows - so it changes the way you will expose the scene (with aperture, amount of lighting, ND filtering ect).
    It will make it easier to expose the sensor to it's best for a given situation...give it as much light as possible in dark situations (protect it from noise) or protect it from highlight clipping in bright ones.

    So - when shooting raw - changing ISO is nothing but you deciding where middle grey is supposed to sit. In the middle, more to the left (protecting highlights) or more to the right (prevent from noise).

    Personally I leave it at ISO 400 for most things.
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